Monday, December 11, 2017

From the Mailbag - November 2017

Comments Thanksgiving 2017

Dick Hochman
Dec 10 (1 day ago)

to me
GIT IT (Trenton’s Jews) YESTERDAY AND FINISHED IT JUST NOW.

WELL-DONE INDEED. GOOD FOR YOU.

NEEDLESS TO SAY, I LOVED IT AND WILL PASS ALONG MY ENTHUSIASM.

ALL THE BEST


----
A. Richard Ross
4:06 PM (15 hours ago)

to me
Art,
Read the item about Hoenig & Swern with interest. An earlier, and perhaps first Jewish owned store was Wirtschafter’s. The family was hit hard by the depression and moved to LA where they thrived. One of my mother’s good childhood friends was Joan Wirtschafter Isen who was 19 when the family headed West. She was the last Trenton member of the family, passing in July 2016 in her 96th year.

German Jews

German Jews settled in Trenton, the state capital, in the 1840s, the most prominent among them being Simon Kahnweiler, a merchant and manufacturer. His brothers followed shortly thereafter: Leon and Emanuel. http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/judaica/ejud_0002_
Sidney Goldman wrote the 1840s bought additional German Jewish families to the area: Dannenburg, Kahn, Schoninger, Frank and Mankos. The 1850s gave us the names: Goldberg, Rosenblatt, Samler, Weinberg, Lowenstein, Solomon, Bohn and others. See Sidney Goldman
Eventually, these German Jews incorporated the Mt. Sinai Cemetery Association was incorporated in the town in 1857 and Har Sinai Congregation held its first service in 1858.

This is not a complete list. The Wirshafter and Rice families belong there also should also be on the list, among others.
 ---

E Jan Kounitz
6:11 PM (14 hours ago)

to me
Hello Arthur,
Hope this finds you in good health & spirits ready for the holiday season.

Just took a look-see at the below info and  “On-the-Map”    True .. ‘blasts-from-the-past.’

Hadn’t seen those two  shanna punums  (sp.?) in over 50 years!    Both were childhood associates. 
I actually was on the same basketball team at the YMHA with Tal Brody, the Maccabees ... he played I kept the bench warm !
And Steve Raam was in my Cub Scout Den .

Presently  waiting for  Dr. Coenen  to get back in touch to set a date to pick up my collage.

Hope you have a very pleasant Thanksgiving.

Shalom,
 Jan

 ---
Arthur Frank
Just so folks can identify, Workmen's Circle is Pitman Ave off Cedar Lane - is it not?

Art - You are, as usual, correct.

I wanted to identify the general area



Sunday, November 19, 2017

“On The Map” with Trenton’s own Tal Brody

 “On The Map” with Trenton’s own Tal Brody, Trenton was represented by Steve and Iris Daner, Jon Weber and his wife, Bruce Zagnit, TCHS Class of 1961 President Jimmy Carrigan and myself (Steven Raam). 








Saturday, November 11, 2017

Yiddish, Part 7

Or shmuts. Dirt – a little dirt, not serious grime. If a little boy has shmutz on his face, and he likely will, his mother will quickly wipe it off. It can also mean dirty language. It’s not nice to talk shmutz about shmutz. A current derivation, “schmitzig,” means a “thigamabob” or a “doodad,” but has nothing to do with filth.

shtick
Something you’re known for doing, an entertainer’s routine, an actor’s bit, stage business; a gimmick often done to draw attention to yourself.

tchatchke
Or tshatshke. Knick-knack, little toy, collectible or giftware. It also appears in sentences such as, “My brother divorced his wife for some little tchatchke.” You can figure that one out.

tsuris
Or tsores. Serious troubles, not minor annoyances. Plagues of lice, gnats, flies, locusts, hail, death… now, those were tsuris.

tuches
Rear end, bottom, backside, buttocks. In proper Yiddish, it’s spelled tuchis or tuches or tokhis, and was the origin of the American slang word tush.

yente
Female busybody or gossip. At one time, high-class parents gave this name to their girls (after all, it has the same root as “gentle”), but it gained the Yiddish meaning of “she-devil”. The matchmaker in “Fiddler on the Roof” was named Yente (and she certainly was a yente though maybe not very high-class), so many people mistakenly think that yente means matchmaker.

yiddisher kop
Smart person. Literally means “Jewish head.” I don’t want to know what goyisher kop means.
As in Hebrew, the ch or kh in Yiddish is a “voiceless fricative,” with a pronunciation between h and k. If you don’t know how to make that sound, pronounce it like an h. Pronouncing it like a k is goyish.


http://www.dailywritingtips.com/the-yiddish-handbook-40-words-you-should-know/