Sunday, July 8, 2018

Selected Yiddish Words and Phrases 11 (Impress friends and family)


ONGEPOTCHKET: Messed up, slapped together without form, excessively and unesthetically decorated.

OY-YOY-YOY: An exclamation of sorrow and lamentation.

OY VEY: "Oh, how terrible things are". OH VEZ MEAR means "Oh, woe is me".

PISHER: A bed-wetter, a young inexperienced person, a person of no consequence.

PLOTZ: To burst, to explode, "I can't laugh anymore or I'll "plotz." To be aggravated beyond bearing. 

Sunday, June 10, 2018

Comments June 2018



Art Frank


May 1, 2018

I did not know how to put this in. The computer said " choose a profile". I opened that and no idea what the choices meant, so I am sending you my comments as follows.

My Aunt, Honey Frank, was the bookkeeper, by title, but a multi-tasker who was part of the triumvirate that ran the original GWH. Amazing how George Blacker, Ruth Felton and Honey ran the whole shebang. So many Frank relatives have been residents of GWH over the years. It is a remarkable place to which we are all dedicated.  Warmly, Art Frank


10:03am May 13
Market St 1900 (formerly Greene St)
Market St 1900 (formerly Greene St)
 
10:38am May 13
Thanks for posting! This is actually North Broad St. Somewhere up on the right was where my husbands' g-grandfather had his shoe and boot store, 1855-1865. It must have been a vibrant time for the growing city. The market was demolished in 1870, but there were several other street markets in the city. The photo below (1869) is from Harry Podmore's book, "Trenton, Old and New". Published in 1927.
Original Post



Top of Form

Maureen Wells Maybe it’s time for someone to revive a weekly downtown farmers market for people who live downtown and may not have cars..after all that’s why they had them in the first place..it could start small then ..who knows??


Arthur Finkle You are absolutely correct. In my haste, when I saw market, I wrote market St. The main market was on Green St.

Maureen Wells My grandfather sold at the market that was down by the river decades ago.. he had a farm in Skillman and then in Colts Neck.. not sure which he sold from...both were a long distance!

Bottom of Form

Trenton Hist Soc Calendar 2018

12/01/2014 6:02PM
Karl Picked it up at Lawrence Pharm. Great stuff. a
8:04AM

Hi Art, I saw your 3/9/1951 Sports Nite article. Can you send me a better copy? The verbiage on the right is cut off. I want to do an exhibit on sports nite at the Trenton City Museum. Do you think the public would have a lot of mementoes from sports nite to loan us? Photos, films, uniforms, pins, etc? Thanks Karl Flesch


Derry Rosebud Thanks for posting! This is actually North Broad St. Somewhere up on the right was where my husbands' g-grandfather had his shoe and boot store, 1855-1865. It must have been a vibrant time for the growing city. The market was demolished in 1870, but there were several other street markets in the city. The photo below (1869) is from Harry Podmore's book, "Trenton, Old and New". Published in 1927.Manage
I read your great article in NJJN written by Michele Alperin that mentions you, and he gave me your email:

I am visiting Trenton this week and I would like to talk to you and ask you some questions.


Best regards,

Emanuel Goldszmidt
Miami, Florida, USA
Mobile 305-992-4247

טראכט גוט וועט זיין גוט
thomas glover
4:34 PM (18 hours ago)
https://mail.google.com/mail/u/2/images/cleardot.gif
https://mail.google.com/mail/u/2/images/cleardot.gif
https://mail.google.com/mail/u/2/images/cleardot.gif
to me
https://mail.google.com/mail/u/2/images/cleardot.gif
Hi Art: You have an EXCELLENT SITE!  I see a number of posts are those that I found and digitized for the Hamilton Township Public Library Local History Collection. I would appreciate it if you cited us the source. As you might imagine, it takes quite a bit of time and effort to find and tweak these historic photos and documents. Thanks so much. 

Tom Glover, 
Hamilton Township Public Library Local History Collection.


On Fri, May 11, 2018 at 09:38 AM, Arthur L. Finkle wrote:
People of Truth Purchase Church Building to Build Shul
Ham Twp Lib
Tom Glover



Top of Form

Comments

Karl J. Flesch Where was the location? Union Street

Har Sinai Outgrows Quarters
Ham. Twp Lib.
Tom Glover

Top of Form


Har Sinai Temple Relocates, 1902

I grew up in Yardley PA. I am doing some ancestry research. My great grandfather Stephen F Arata, had a candy store in Trenton NJ in 1908. I am hoping someone may have some very old photos or other information about this candy store. The store was located at17 North Broad Street. I do not know the name of the candy store. Thank you in advance,

David Arata, Moorpark California











I grew up in Yardley PA. I am doing some ancestry research. My great grandfather Stephen F Arata, had a candy store in Trenton NJ in 1908. I am hoping someone may have some very old photos or other information about this candy store. The store was located at 17 North Broad Street. I do not know the name of the candy store. Thank you in advance,


David Arata, Moorpark California









Saturday, April 21, 2018

Shavuot


Shavuot



Shavuot was one of the three pilgrimage festivals during the year. (The others: Passover and Sukot). The Rabbi’s later religiously transformed these agricultural festivals.

During Shavuot, the High Priest acted on behalf of the people. He presented a special Shavuot wave-offering, two loaves of bread made of wheat, the first products of the spring wheat harvest that begins just as the barley harvest comes to an end on the holy altar on Passover. Thus, Shavuot in Second Temple times celebrated the bounty of the spring harvest season.

The Festival is Transformed


In rabbinic times, a remarkable transformation of the festival took place. Based on the verse "In the third month after the children of Israel were gone forth out of the land of Egypt, the same day they came into the wilderness of Sinai," [Exodus 19:1] the festival of Shavuot became the anniversary of the giving of the Torah at Sinai.

Although Shavuot was known in the Bible by several names, including the Feast of the Harvest, the Festival of Weeks, and the Festival of the First Fruits, the sages added the name "Atzeret"-- withdrawal. In the Torah, the last days of the two other pilgrim festivals (Passover and Sukkot) are referred to as Atzeret to indicate on the seventh day of Passover and on the eighth day after the beginning of Sukkot, there must be a withdrawal from all menial labor.

Shavuot, too, was given the name of Atzeret by the Rabbis to emphasize the necessity of abstaining from menial labor on this holiday as well. They refused to adopt the theme of "Giving the Torah" because they thought it would be sacrilegious to limit the celebration of the giving of the Torah to a single day. To them, every day of the year should be considered as a day of receiving the Torah anew.

In traditional settings, the Book of Ruth is read on the second day of Shavuot.

Ruth, a widowed Moabite, married to a Jew follows her Israelite mother-in-law, Naomi, into the Jewish people with the famous words “whither you go, I will go, wherever you lodge, I will lodge, your people will be my people, and your God will be my God.”

She asserts the right of the poor to glean the leftovers of the barley harvest, breaks the normal rules of behavior to confront her kinsman Boaz, is redeemed by him for marriage, and becomes the ancestor of King David.

Read the full text of the Book of Ruth in Hebrew and English on Sefaria.org. (https://www.sefaria.org/search?q=book%20of%20ruth&var=1&sort=r)

The Talmudic tractate of Soferim (14:16), cites the Midrash of Ruth of with the giving of the Torah. Thus, such evidence establishes this practice by the time this Midrash was compiled.
(Tractate Soferim is one of the latest books of the Talmud, probably dating no earlier than the eighth century.)

There are many explanations given for the reading of Ruth on Shavuot. The most quoted reason is that Ruth’s coming to Israel took place around the time of Shavuot, and her acceptance into the Jewish faith was analogous of the acceptance of the Jewish people of God’s Torah.

A second explanation relates to genealogy. Since the Book of Ruth ends with the genealogy of David, whose forbearer Ruth was, it has been suggested that it is read on Shavuot because there is a legend that David died on Shavuot.

Another reason for the reading of Ruth on Shavuot is that its story takes place at harvest time, and Shavuot also occurs at the time of the spring harvest.

Customary Foods - Dairy
 
Blintzes

Bareakes

Cheesecake

Every Jewish festival has special associated foods.

Although everyone agrees that the food of choice for  is cheese, most typically blintzes, or a Sephardic equivalent such as bourekas, there are differences of opinion (some quite charming) as to why it is a custom.

Some derive the practice directly from scripture, saying we eat dairy to symbolize the “land flowing with milk and honey” (Exodus 3:8) promised to the Israelites, or that “milk and honey are under your tongue” (Song of Songs 4:11). These passages, along with “The precepts of the Lord are… sweeter than honey” (Psalm 19:9-11) also indicate we should eat honey, which is customary in some communities.
A sage discovered that the initials of the four Hebrew words in Numbers 28:26, which describe the sacrificial meal offering on Shavuot, spell mei halav (from milk), suggesting that dairy food is the acceptable dinner for the festival. At Sinai, the Israelites were considered to be as innocent as newborns, whose food is milk.
Those of kabbalistic [mystical] bent equate the numerical value of the word halav (milk) = 40 (‘het’=8, ‘lamed’=30, ‘vet’=2), with the number of days Moses spent on Mount Sinai receiving the Ten Commandments and other teachings (Exodus 24:18). Others look to the mountain itself, which is termed in Psalms mount of gavnunim (68:15), meaning many peaks. They connect that description with the Hebrew word gevinah, meaning cheese.
Scholars who trace all Jewish customs and rituals to practices common among various ethnic groups claim that spring harvest festivals characteristically featured dairy dishes, perhaps because cheese was produced during that season.
Along with blintzes and bourekascheesecake is a widely popular Shavuot item. Some eat kreplachthree-cornered dumplings that are often filled with meat but can be cheese filled or even vegetable filled. They are supposed to remind us of the Bible, which is comprised of three sections (Torah, Nevi’im and Ketuvim / Torah, Prophets and Writings), which was given to Israel through Moses, who was the third child of Amran (after Aaron and Miriam), following three days of preparation (Exodus 19:11) in the third month of the year (Exodus 19:1).


Excerpted with permission from Every Person’s Guide to Shavuot (Jason Aronson, Inc).
http://www.myjewishlearning.com/article/why-do-we-read-the-book-of-ruth-on-shavuot/?utm_source=MyJewishLearning+Newsletter&utm_campaign=3439b96317-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2017_03_24&; Rabbi Ronald H. Isaacs,